Author Topic: 04/17 podcast  (Read 2382 times)

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Offline bselig

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04/17 podcast
« on: March 17, 2005, 10:51:21 pm »
Initially, like most here, I came for the fantastic Spore coverage, which was exceptional compared to what else was out there.  The idea of a more industry or business-centric episodic radio show is pretty intriguing, so I will be listening and wish you well.  The tidbit about Jade Empire was a great example of something you won't find in other similar(I dunno, how many game podcasts are there?) venues.

Can't help but nitpick something in the Resident Evil review though.  The interactive cutscene thing was a huge feature in Shenmue. Not really a huge fan of the series,, but that bit was hyped to helll back when it came out, even leading people to ask whether the game was just a series of Dragon's Lair-esque interactive cutscenes after early previews. 

Also re Max Payne 2:  personally, I didn't like the super-duper slow mo style of the second, whereas in the first, it was pretty much exclusively diving(you could go into free-form slow motion, but it was a pretty big waste of bullet time).  Felt a lot more fun that way to me and I wonder if the shift hurt the game's appeal.  That and it seemed like 2 was more focused on set-piece engagementss.

Anyhow, enjoyed the 'cast and hope you're able to find an audience.



Offline Gaming Steve

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Re: 04/17 podcast
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2005, 12:01:59 am »
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Can't help but nitpick something in the Resident Evil review though.  The interactive cutscene thing was a huge feature in Shenmue. Not really a huge fan of the series,, but that bit was hyped to helll back when it came out, even leading people to ask whether the game was just a series of Dragon's Lair-esque interactive cutscenes after early previews.

Ah yes, you are correct. However, I would say that the difference between Sheumue and RE4 is that Sheumue treated the interactive cutscenes the same way Dragon's Lair did. Where it was a scripted sequence in which you had to press buttons at a certain time in order to advance.

RE4 does it a bit differently and I think it makes a huge difference. First of all, the buttons you need to press during the action are random, so you can't memorize the pattern 100%. Second, the interaction is much less (perhaps just one area of interaction in an entire scene, perhaps zero) and often it's several minutes into the cutscene. Since you are never 100% sure when you can relax this helps to add a good amount of tension into the game. Third, unlike Sheumue where if you make a mistake with a button push you trip over some boxes in RE4 you make a mistake and you can get your head cut off. Again, that helps in adding to the tension within the game.

So I do agree that you are correct that other games have done this in the past. What I should have pointed out was that RE4 has perfected this interaction so that its seamlessly integrated into the gameplay without being cheezy.

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Also re Max Payne 2:  personally, I didn't like the super-duper slow mo style of the second, whereas in the first, it was pretty much exclusively diving(you could go into free-form slow motion, but it was a pretty big waste of bullet time).  Felt a lot more fun that way to me and I wonder if the shift hurt the game's appeal.  That and it seemed like 2 was more focused on set-piece engagementss.

Max Payne 2 is just one of those games I thoroughly enjoyed. In the review I was really talking about Max Payne 2's level design, which was some of the very best I have seen. I know several level designers at some very large game companies who study the level design of that game religiously. For example, the fun house level is just level design mastery ... and it's such a simple and elegant design. It doesn't use a lot of tricks to allow the player to experience the same level twice, but yet in a completely different way. And it's a natural industrial setting with a lot of open space around it, thereby allowing the player to fully experience the level design and structure.

Ah, I really love that game. You are correct, that game was mostly set-piece engagements, but they were done so well and told such an interesting story that it made a great gaming experience. And in the end ... that's all that matters to me.

Thanks for the kind comments, I hope you enjoy the show and I'll do my best to cover as many "behind the scene" aspects as possible.
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