Author Topic: binary star systems  (Read 7589 times)

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Offline kolpo

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binary star systems
« on: April 08, 2006, 06:31:28 am »
A very interesting thing for spore seems me multi star systems, the sky of the pottential planet around it would be very interesting, with multiply suns raising at different times. This planet would often have very bright nights and in some cases even no nights at all. This would prevend night animals(like cats) from ever developing but bright nights would make live easier for all the rest.

Most of the stars are part of multi star systems. Single stars like the sun are the exception rather then the norm. A jupiter like planet has already been discovered in a multi star system(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HD_188753_Ab) and even earth like planets aren't an impossibility for as long as the stars aren't too close.

Maybe could even both stars of a binary system have a earth like planet allowing contanct between those 2 civilization way before they discover star travel(a voyager like satelite would be advanced enough to reach each other).




Offline Brutus

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2006, 06:43:15 am »
its a thought but what would be the need forthis, one star is fine
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Offline CommunistHamster

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2006, 07:52:05 am »
Hmm, can planets orbiting around the same sun crash into each other in a horrific disaster?
(apologies for n00bish question)

Offline Daxx

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2006, 07:55:35 am »
Possibly, but I would guess they'd all be in stable orbits by the time you discover them. If you could find one with a partially-formed accretion disc, you might get to see the horrific accidents.

Multiple stars just have a coolness factor that can't be beaten without megatructures.

Offline Hydromancerx

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2006, 07:57:34 am »

Offline Brutus

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2006, 08:01:35 am »
Hmm, can planets orbiting around the same sun crash into each other in a horrific disaster?
(apologies for n00bish question)

yes, but if this is gonna happen, it happens incredibly early in the systems lifetime
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Offline huggkruka

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2006, 08:46:08 am »
Could happen later too. The chances of collision increases for every year that goes by though. Seeing as Will Wright is an astronomy nut, I think he'll put some cool space phenomena in Spore.

Offline slugfly

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2006, 11:20:43 am »
also, it doesn't take a binary system to have risks of planetary collision.  Earth and Mars could collide as could Pluto and Neptune (or Neptune and Uranus... or Uranus and Pluto...  damned if I know which two it is).  But given the amount of space involved and the relatively small size of the planets, it's a very very slim chance.  So slim in fact that (thankfully) it hasn't even happened once in 4 and a half billion years  ;D  ... at least not to us anyway...  not sure what exactly caused our nearby asteroid belt.

Offline mrodgers

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2006, 11:49:30 am »
also, it doesn't take a binary system to have risks of planetary collision.  Earth and Mars could collide as could Pluto and Neptune (or Neptune and Uranus... or Uranus and Pluto...  damned if I know which two it is).  But given the amount of space involved and the relatively small size of the planets, it's a very very slim chance.  So slim in fact that (thankfully) it hasn't even happened once in 4 and a half billion years  ;D  ... at least not to us anyway...  not sure what exactly caused our nearby asteroid belt.

Barring the entry or exit of a significant mass in the solar system those planets will never collide.  For earth and mars there is no place where their orbits cross.  As for Neptune and Pluto, whose orbits do cross, they are tidally locked which prevents them from getting too close together. 

Sorry.  In a fully formed system with no change in Mass or velocity there won't be any collisions.  Early on, there were collisions (the Moon was formed by a collision of a Mars size planet with Earth) but the solar system has been stable for a very very very long time.
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Offline slugfly

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2006, 01:31:00 pm »
aha!  But what is early on?  We're at 4.5 billion years right now, and that seems like a very long time indeed...  but think about what our perspective is...  a piddly 90 years...  maybe even 5000 if we look at recorded history...  let's be generous and say 20,000 since we got to the tribal stage (spore spore spore... I bloody breathe it).  So our frame of perspective, our sense of 'early' and 'late' could pass by entirely something like 200,000 times since the very beginning.  This might make us think it's well under way but what if a system takes something on the order 20 billion years to stabilize.

Actually, I trust what you've said and think that despite the perspective thing we are indeed well under way.  But it's neat to think of the alternatives.

Offline Sporific

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2006, 01:33:11 pm »
I love the idea of two stars. :D My Cataphant creature (which I'll put up soon) lives in a binary star system, in which a non-active brown dwarf orbits a very active red dwarf. The Cataphon planet is orbitting the inactive star but the red dwarf produces enough heat to energize the planet.

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Offline CommunistHamster

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2006, 01:34:19 pm »
In the GDC video, it clearly showed 2 planets with intersecting orbits. Surely they might collide?

Offline Samog

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2006, 02:19:18 pm »
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Offline Brutus

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #13 on: April 08, 2006, 03:08:12 pm »
i think if they made planets collide they would just intersect with each other and then vaporise  (not with out the explosion like the one that the death star weapon thing does)
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Offline kolpo

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #14 on: April 08, 2006, 03:38:30 pm »
I love the idea of two stars. :D My Cataphant creature (which I'll put up soon) lives in a binary star system, in which a non-active brown dwarf orbits a very active red dwarf. The Cataphon planet is orbitting the inactive star but the red dwarf produces enough heat to energize the planet.



In that example wouldn't the brown dwarf simply rotate around the red dwarf but would both instead rotate around a common barycenter. Depending on the mass of both objects could this result in a very variable distance between the brown dwarf and the red dwarf, making the temperatures of your brown dwarf planet/moon also very variable. You can see a simulation of how double stars behave depending on mass relation here: http://instruct1.cit.cornell.edu/courses/astro101/java/binary/binary.htm You clearly see that the distance between the 2 stars varies a lot. Thought live could possible adapt to this by doing a wintersleep or by moving between the north and south depending on the current temperature(like birds do).

Thought it's an interesting idea to have live on a brown dwarf it's moon/planet, maybe could the brown dwarf itself radiate enough heat for your planet or generate at least enough heat to help your planet survive the cold periods when the red dwarf is far away from the brown dwarf. Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune already produce more heat then they receive from the sun. Brown dwarfs have 12-89 times more mass and they fuse deuterium(not sure how much extra heat that would produce).
The tides created by the brown dwarf would be gigantic(similar with how Jupiter it's tides transformed IO in an extremely unstable planet with quite constant volcanic eruptions) just like it's magnetic field. Could a planet/moon of a brown dwarf be close enough to have habitable temperatures without becoming a second IO where constant volcanic eruptions and magnetic fields make live impossible?

It is believed that there is a gigantic amount of brown dwarfs, so even if there is only a very small chance that one has a habitable planet could there still be many :) We know only 10% of the galaxy it's predicted mass and some people believe that most of the remaining 90% are brown dwarfs, that's a lot of dwarfs :)