Author Topic: binary star systems  (Read 7432 times)

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Offline Dr Dozzy

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #45 on: April 15, 2006, 11:26:45 am »
Remeber, the Wired picture, gave us a look at the sort of Space things Wright must have wanted in, heres a version with real space pictures overlapped:

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Offline slugfly

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #46 on: April 15, 2006, 11:36:07 am »
aren't the two on the bottom left the same thing?  Or is the very bottom left a supernova?   And what is the bottom right?  The top left seems a black hole (doesn't look like a binary system) and the top right is a galaxy... doesn't leave much for the bottom right.

Offline Daxx

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #47 on: April 15, 2006, 11:44:24 am »
The bottom right's a quasar.

Offline slugfly

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #48 on: April 15, 2006, 12:02:00 pm »
I know what pulsars are, what's a quasar?  I've heard the term many times but I don't know it.

Offline Daxx

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #49 on: April 15, 2006, 12:55:32 pm »
I know what pulsars are, what's a quasar?  I've heard the term many times but I don't know it.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quasar should explain things.

However, you're probably right. I don't think I was thinking straight when I said quasar. The bottom right could well be a pulsar.

Offline Tantalus

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #50 on: April 15, 2006, 01:44:50 pm »
A pulsar is just a neutron star that is spinning really fast, which astronomers beleive all neutron stars are doing because of the conservation of angular momentum.

And I notice one error in that wikipedia article at least "quasars are the brightest objects in the known universe", thats wrong supernova are the brightest things in the universe. For a breif second they produce almost as much energy as the rest of the universe combined, which is why when you see them occuring in other galaxies they completely obscure that galaxy.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2006, 01:48:08 pm by Tantalus »

Offline Dr Dozzy

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #51 on: April 15, 2006, 02:01:10 pm »
Actually the bottem right is a black hole galaxy.
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Offline Brutus

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #52 on: April 15, 2006, 04:39:07 pm »
well thats exactly what i'm saying, but after you blo up a planet there is a ring but its not as complicated as a real ring.

No, what you're saying is that the planet won't be ripped apart in the first place. How do you know that? You're not on the dev team, last time I checked.

watch the video after the planet is blown up theres a new ring there and WW even says "well, we made a new ring, it was a good crafts project."
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Offline Daxx

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #53 on: April 15, 2006, 04:54:32 pm »
well thats exactly what i'm saying, but after you blo up a planet there is a ring but its not as complicated as a real ring.

No, what you're saying is that the planet won't be ripped apart in the first place. How do you know that? You're not on the dev team, last time I checked.

watch the video after the planet is blown up theres a new ring there and WW even says "well, we made a new ring, it was a good crafts project."

I can see that, but that's not what we're talking about. I'm going to explain this to you very slowly, I hope you'll be able to follow.

What you said is that gravitational friction won't create a ring system from a planet. You don't know this for certain unless you're on the development team, and I can't believe you are employed by Maxis. This has nothing to do with blowing up a planet which we already know creates rings.

Offline slugfly

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #54 on: April 16, 2006, 12:39:05 am »
by 'ring system' do you mean inhabitable rings or natural rings around stars?  I can't imagine there not being rings already around stars...  and I seriously hope that we'll have rings around planets as well.

Offline Brutus

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #55 on: April 21, 2006, 08:50:27 am »
Most of the stars are part of multi star systems. Single stars like the sun are the exception rather then the norm.

our solar system does have another star, infact in a few million years its going to kill all of us, it's called nemesis,

`Nemesis', is the ominous name scientists came up with when they began speculating about the sinister space body in 1984. They couldn't have picked a better name: Nemesis is one of the worst enemies of life on earth. Our solar system is what Nemesis calls `home'. And the bad part is: home is where Nemesis is heading.

What Nemesis is? It's nothing less than our Sun's twin brother. Yes, that's right: a second Sun! In the cosmos, many stars come in pairs. And according to the Nemesis theory, our `star' -- the Sun -- is no exception.

But wait -- why then do we see only one Sun? Well, for one thing, Nemesis is REALLY far away at the moment. Nemesis orbits the Sun in a huge ellipse, with its furthest point a distance of three light years away. But once every 25 to 30 million years, Nemesis closes in on the Sun. It slams into the outer regions of our solar system: a place called the Oort Cloud, at a distance of about half a light year away from the Sun.

And that would mean trouble for us tiny earthlings. The gravitational pull of Sun #2 would cause mayhem in the belt of cosmic debris that makes up the Oort Cloud. Comets and meteorites would fling off in all directions, at unimaginable speeds. For many thousands of years, our solar system -- including Earth -- will be bombarded with comets. And we all know what happens to terrestrial life when someone starts gunning our planet with colossal pieces of space rock.


and yes , i know i didnt write this, i am to lazy to write this
« Last Edit: April 21, 2006, 09:13:55 am by Brutus_ »
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Offline mrodgers

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #56 on: April 21, 2006, 10:20:43 am »
Most of the stars are part of multi star systems. Single stars like the sun are the exception rather then the norm.

our solar system does have another star, infact in a few million years its going to kill all of us, it's called nemesis,

`Nemesis', is the ominous name scientists came up with when they began speculating about the sinister space body in 1984. They couldn't have picked a better name: Nemesis is one of the worst enemies of life on earth. Our solar system is what Nemesis calls `home'. And the bad part is: home is where Nemesis is heading.

What Nemesis is? It's nothing less than our Sun's twin brother. Yes, that's right: a second Sun! In the cosmos, many stars come in pairs. And according to the Nemesis theory, our `star' -- the Sun -- is no exception.

But wait -- why then do we see only one Sun? Well, for one thing, Nemesis is REALLY far away at the moment. Nemesis orbits the Sun in a huge ellipse, with its furthest point a distance of three light years away. But once every 25 to 30 million years, Nemesis closes in on the Sun. It slams into the outer regions of our solar system: a place called the Oort Cloud, at a distance of about half a light year away from the Sun.

And that would mean trouble for us tiny earthlings. The gravitational pull of Sun #2 would cause mayhem in the belt of cosmic debris that makes up the Oort Cloud. Comets and meteorites would fling off in all directions, at unimaginable speeds. For many thousands of years, our solar system -- including Earth -- will be bombarded with comets. And we all know what happens to terrestrial life when someone starts gunning our planet with colossal pieces of space rock.


and yes , i know i didnt write this, i am to lazy to write this


Well I don't know if you are being serious or not but in case anyone is wondering, the Nemesis theory has been disproven.  It was originally presented to explain some "gravitational anomolies" in the sun's orbit which have since been explained.  Nemesis is a good Asimov book though.
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Offline slugfly

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #57 on: April 21, 2006, 11:38:09 am »
quite an interesting thought...  I'm reading about it now (wherever I can find it) and it seems to me that rather than 'disproven' it's 'unproven' and unaccepted.  :)   Get's a 4 nose salute in Slug's book  ;D  Not that it's anything to be worried about.  According to the current theory we'd have at least 10 million years before the next disturbance, and even then a few million years after that before the rush of comets starts to get near enough Earth to be a problem.  I'm sure by then we'll have discovered the star already and made provisions...  if we haven't already expanded our species beyond the solar system by then.

Offline Brutus

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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #58 on: April 21, 2006, 12:28:58 pm »
slugflys is right,  its not un-accepted that it exsists but there is still a chance that it does, its hasn't been proven to be untrue, and might you need reminding that it is 3 light years away and its can't be seen but it still orbits our solar system,

 a team of distinguished US astronomers of Berkeley and Princeton calculated that Nemesis, is a brown dwarf. Meanwhile, John Matese of the University of Louisiana studied the orbits of 82 comets in the Oort Cloud. According to Matese, their orbits had some elements in common that could only be explained if the comets had been influenced by the gravitational pull of an object several times the size of Jupiter.

so nemesis or no nemesis there IS somthing out there that is ****ing huge orbiting us, and it could be nemesis, but either way were screwed

but we'll find out for sure in 13 million years, so thats lots of time to think about it
« Last Edit: April 21, 2006, 12:40:37 pm by Brutus_ »
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Re: binary star systems
« Reply #59 on: April 23, 2006, 12:56:09 pm »
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