Author Topic: Gasping for Air  (Read 12351 times)

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Offline Behumat

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #30 on: March 29, 2006, 04:23:08 pm »
They used them in Iraq during Desert Storm. Even warned everyone first, dropping little fliers on the iraqi army, telling them what they were going to do, and when they were going to do it. Saddam and his generals didn't beleive it, so they kept their armies out on that field of battle. US dropped the bomb, and it wasnt' pretty. The next time the US decided to use an FAE bomb, they did the same thing, dropping warning fliers, the troops were so eager to leave, some shot their own officers.



Offline Tantalus

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #31 on: March 29, 2006, 06:28:52 pm »
lol, though I suppose having your lungs sucked out isn't exactly the funnest way to go.

Offline Tarrasque

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #32 on: March 29, 2006, 07:13:31 pm »
also would you freeze to death before suffocating?

Temperature in space is a complicated thing. There is the "cold of space" alright, but as a matter of fact vacuum itself does not have a temperature. When you float through the vacuum, then there are no molecules around you that can take the energy away from your body like cold air in the arctic, or even worse, cold water. Water is a much better temperature conductor than air. Metal is also very good, that is why metal at room temperature "feels cold to the touch". This is caused by the elctron gas, ie the freely moving electrons which also responsible for electric conductivity. Air is actually pretty good at isolating. Vacuum is the best isolator known to man. Temperature loss is only caused by what you radiate away, and that is relatively little, at least compared to our everyday experience.

In short, you don't shockfreeze solid in space. It takes a while before you have radiated away the body heat. I don't know exactly how long. As long as you live, you also create heat. It also depends on solar radiation. It can heat you up tremendously. Look at the moon, on its day side you have temperatures in excess of 100C, on the night side it goes down to -150C and below. Thant means that your face is roasting and the back of your head gets awful cold!  ;D

But that doesn't matter anyway, since due complete air deprivation, you die very quickly.


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"Passing out in 15 seconds." And the advice: Don't hold your breath. In the words of The Will:
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"That's that!"
« Last Edit: March 29, 2006, 07:22:06 pm by Tarrasque »
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Offline Tantalus

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #33 on: March 29, 2006, 07:45:47 pm »
Hmm nice to know. I knew that we would only lose heat by radiating it but I wasn't really sure how fast that would be, because as you mentioned we generate heat and I have no idea how fast we radiate heat because I've always been in contact with something that would either cool me down or heat me up.

Anyway, intereasting read!

Now... Would anyone happen to know anything about the Kamakura Age in  Japan and the Confessions of Lady Nijo? lol

Offline Skraeling

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #34 on: March 29, 2006, 08:15:39 pm »
no no i wasnt suggesting you flash freeze, (wonder what temp that woudl happen at) but just if you would freeze to death or die from radiation or exxcess heat, or oxygen deprivation first :)

fun debate, not so fun to think about hah.

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #35 on: March 29, 2006, 09:59:58 pm »
Well, regardless of good scientific basis, you have to admit it does look pretty cool to see that spider thing explode.
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Offline Willeisen

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #36 on: March 29, 2006, 10:39:21 pm »
also would you freeze to death before suffocating?

Temperature in space is a complicated thing.

My understanding is that it depends on how far you are away, or where you are in relation to a sorce of energy. For example... If were are on the bright side of the moon you would die of radiation and the the sun's unobstructed heat. If you were on the dark side of the moon the energy radiating out of your body would disipate rapidly making you a human popcicle...of course you would die of rapid decompression first either way...so this is just in theory... :P
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Offline Tonjevic

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #37 on: April 03, 2006, 03:47:58 am »
also would you freeze to death before suffocating?
And look what i have found!

http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/970603.html

Link on the site above:
http://www.sff.net/people/geoffrey.landis/vacuum.html


"Passing out in 15 seconds." And the advice: Don't hold your breath. In the words of The Will:
Quote
"That's that!"

This affirms my argument: it says in one of those sites that you DO, in fact, depressurise, and that there is distortion of the skin and underlying vessels.
I am sorry for calling you an idiot; I wasn't in a very good mood at that point, and I didn't pursue it because I didn't want any animosity between us.
I never said that the person had to eplode, as such. I can't imaging what would knock someone out in ten seconds, though, unless it be the depressurisation factor.

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Offline starshard0

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #38 on: April 03, 2006, 09:07:05 am »
also would you freeze to death before suffocating?
And look what i have found!

http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/970603.html

Link on the site above:
http://www.sff.net/people/geoffrey.landis/vacuum.html


"Passing out in 15 seconds." And the advice: Don't hold your breath. In the words of The Will:
Quote
"That's that!"

This affirms my argument: it says in one of those sites that you DO, in fact, depressurise, and that there is distortion of the skin and underlying vessels.
I am sorry for calling you an idiot; I wasn't in a very good mood at that point, and I didn't pursue it because I didn't want any animosity between us.
I never said that the person had to eplode, as such. I can't imaging what would knock someone out in ten seconds, though, unless it be the depressurisation factor.
Well, when you enter a vaccuum, all the air in your lungs is sucked out (unless you hold your breath, which is dangerous), so unlike under water (where there is still oxygen in your lungs to keep oxygen-rich blood circulating), there is no oxygen, therefore no brain activity, therefore no consciousness.
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Offline Tonjevic

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #39 on: April 03, 2006, 01:07:35 pm »
I would assume some oxygen would remain in the bloodstream for more than 15 seconds. There is a diver, the name of who eludes me, who breaths out before diving without any oxygen.

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Offline mrodgers

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #40 on: April 03, 2006, 01:21:07 pm »
I would assume some oxygen would remain in the bloodstream for more than 15 seconds. There is a diver, the name of who eludes me, who breaths out before diving without any oxygen.

Breathing out refers to removing the CO2 in their system not the O2.  Without any O2 you can't survive for more than about a minute and a half with no stress on the body.
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Offline Skraeling

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #41 on: April 03, 2006, 05:31:04 pm »
they hyperventilate before taking a final deep breath before diving as far as i know.

No, really.  I am a card carrying scientist.

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #42 on: April 04, 2006, 07:25:27 am »
I would assume some oxygen would remain in the bloodstream for more than 15 seconds. There is a diver, the name of who eludes me, who breaths out before diving without any oxygen.

Breathing out refers to removing the CO2 in their system not the O2. Without any O2 you can't survive for more than about a minute and a half with no stress on the body.

Yep. When you hold your breath, the buildup of CO2 is what causes you to gasp for air - not a lack of O2. By exhaling the CO2 they can delay the CO2 toxicity response (the gasp) and hold their breath longer.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2006, 07:28:28 am by AnotherMike »
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Offline mrodgers

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #43 on: April 04, 2006, 07:28:53 am »
I would assume some oxygen would remain in the bloodstream for more than 15 seconds. There is a diver, the name of who eludes me, who breaths out before diving without any oxygen.

Breathing out refers to removing the CO2 in their system not the O2. Without any O2 you can't survive for more than about a minute and a half with no stress on the body.

Yep. When you hold your breath, the buildup of CO2 is what causes you to gasp for air - not a lack of O2.

Which is an issue with hyperventalating.  You remove CO2 without adding much more O2 to the blood preventing your body from sensing that you need more O2 when your current supply runs out.  It is a leading cause of Shallow water drowning in free diving.
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Offline beastt

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Re: Gasping for Air
« Reply #44 on: April 04, 2006, 08:16:00 am »
just going back a bit would you be able to have a under-water
creature on a planet with out an atmosphere ???
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