Author Topic: The next, next generation. By me.  (Read 4695 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Borogove

  • Venture Conqueror
  • ****
  • Posts: 779
  • mimsy: adj. - flimsy and miserable :(
    • View Profile
    • Meyermike.com
Re: The next, next generation. By me.
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2006, 08:41:18 pm »
My own view of next-next-next generation would actually be totally the opposite.

Demands for the sort of thing Kishmond mentions will drive development costs up ridiculously, and the "AAA" game business will be generating less and less profit for the companies that do it.  The games industry may be headed for another "crash" as buzzwords like "next-gen" and "HD era" continue to lead the big companies down the wrong path.  With Spore, Will Wright hopes to of an alternative to exploding development costs, but only time will tell how successful it is. 
Meanwhile, more "casual" games, Popcap-type online gaming portals, and indie games will, if anything, become ever more popular over time, since the development costs there are not tied to advances in technology.

This actually doesn't bother me a bit, since the hobbyist and indie games are my main interest anyway.  I mean, I certainly enjoy the "AAA" commercial games out there when I do buy them, but I actually spend way more time with things like the Experimental Gameplay Project, Indie Game Jam, student projects, indie games, and little browser-based games.

I admit that it is a little harder to separate the wheat from the chaff when many of these games are so low-profile...but I find that since they require much less investment from me than the big games it doesn't bother me when I come across a stinker.  Most are free anyway, and I almost always enjoy them for at least a few minutes.

Ok. rant over. my apologies :)
Use those talents you have. You will make it. You will give joy to the world. Take this tip from nature: The woods would be a very silent place if no birds sang except those who sang best.
-- Bernard Meltzer

Check out my games:  http://www.meyermike.com

Offline Piloteer

  • Ensign Seventh Class
  • *****
  • Posts: 2922
  • We're going to hit the mountain!
    • View Profile
Re: The next, next generation. By me.
« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2006, 10:15:00 pm »
Anyways... speaking of the next, next generation. I have lately been wondering what would happen to video games after they achieved perfect graphical quality. Whether you think that would look real or surreal is up to you. I should think that after that they would start cramming truckloads of content into the game. For example, in a game that involved a city, you would be able to go in every building, every office floor, every bathroom ( ;)), every parking garage and EVERYTHING would look perfect. The entire environment would be fully destructable without any debris or bead bodies ever vanishing, but being taken to a dump or morgue by NPCs with 365 day, malleable, schedules. Individually. Every window pane, light bulb, drawer of pajamas, chainsaw, could be picked up and interacted with somehow. Every one of the several hundred thousand people in the city would be interactable, killable, and every action would have a realistic outcome.

Now this is just one city. Imagine an entire country. A Continent. A planet. A solar system. A UNIVERSE. Video games will go on as long as humankind, and so will it's advancement. There are literally no boundaries.

I'm getting goosebumps just reading what I wrote...

Eh, it's going to be a long, looong time for that to happen, if ever.

I think your expectations are a little too high.  :-\

Offline Vivec

  • Gauntlet Wizard
  • *****
  • Posts: 4885
  • The truth has vanished into darkness...
    • View Profile
Re: The next, next generation. By me.
« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2006, 10:18:38 pm »
Anyways... speaking of the next, next generation. I have lately been wondering what would happen to video games after they achieved perfect graphical quality. Whether you think that would look real or surreal is up to you. I should think that after that they would start cramming truckloads of content into the game. For example, in a game that involved a city, you would be able to go in every building, every office floor, every bathroom ( ;)), every parking garage and EVERYTHING would look perfect. The entire environment would be fully destructable without any debris or bead bodies ever vanishing, but being taken to a dump or morgue by NPCs with 365 day, malleable, schedules. Individually. Every window pane, light bulb, drawer of pajamas, chainsaw, could be picked up and interacted with somehow. Every one of the several hundred thousand people in the city would be interactable, killable, and every action would have a realistic outcome.

Now this is just one city. Imagine an entire country. A Continent. A planet. A solar system. A UNIVERSE. Video games will go on as long as humankind, and so will it's advancement. There are literally no boundaries.

I'm getting goosebumps just reading what I wrote...

Eh, it's going to be a long, looong time for that to happen, if ever.

I think your expectations are a little too high. :-\

But it would still be the coolest thing evur.
Vivec, you're the best forum member ever.

Offline Piloteer

  • Ensign Seventh Class
  • *****
  • Posts: 2922
  • We're going to hit the mountain!
    • View Profile
Re: The next, next generation. By me.
« Reply #18 on: February 03, 2006, 01:12:24 am »
My own view of next-next-next generation would actually be totally the opposite.

Demands for the sort of thing Kishmond mentions will drive development costs up ridiculously, and the "AAA" game business will be generating less and less profit for the companies that do it. The games industry may be headed for another "crash" as buzzwords like "next-gen" and "HD era" continue to lead the big companies down the wrong path. With Spore, Will Wright hopes to of an alternative to exploding development costs, but only time will tell how successful it is.
Meanwhile, more "casual" games, Popcap-type online gaming portals, and indie games will, if anything, become ever more popular over time, since the development costs there are not tied to advances in technology.

This actually doesn't bother me a bit, since the hobbyist and indie games are my main interest anyway. I mean, I certainly enjoy the "AAA" commercial games out there when I do buy them, but I actually spend way more time with things like the Experimental Gameplay Project, Indie Game Jam, student projects, indie games, and little browser-based games.

I admit that it is a little harder to separate the wheat from the chaff when many of these games are so low-profile...but I find that since they require much less investment from me than the big games it doesn't bother me when I come across a stinker. Most are free anyway, and I almost always enjoy them for at least a few minutes.

Ok. rant over. my apologies :)

Hmmm....this sounds really familiar. *Revolution*

I personally can't wait for Revolution to come out. May 9th wont come fast enough!