Author Topic: Ask An Artist Anything!  (Read 2160 times)

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Offline Gec

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Ask An Artist Anything!
« on: August 09, 2013, 09:33:08 pm »
Ridiculous question threads are running a muck! Although seeking useless knowledge about your lovely peers on this forum is a barrel of monkeys, how about asking questions to a subject you parents always warned you against pursuing because they said you would never amount to anything in this world as an artist. Let's begin shall we?

Anyone is open to ask a question, anyone is open to answer. I can answer most general art questions, or anything pertaining to advanced cartooning. If you are looking for something deeper, I may suggest some good reading on a number of topics.



Offline Yuu

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Re: Ask An Artist Anything!
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2013, 11:09:20 pm »
What do you think is a better way to make highlights and shadows, brushes or lineart?

Also, what's your opinion on 2d art placed over 3d backgrounds, like say this...


Online Inkling

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Re: Ask An Artist Anything!
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2013, 11:20:41 pm »
Since when does Tails have massive boobs?
Probably not a Goat, either.


Offline Krakow Sam

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Re: Ask An Artist Anything!
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2013, 02:13:21 am »
That's not Tails. That's a totally original character, Blails.
Sam is basically right, he's just cranky.

Offline Plank of Wood

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Re: Ask An Artist Anything!
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2013, 09:42:55 am »
People need to get their facts straight.
the real saviour of this forum

Offline PatMan33

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Re: Ask An Artist Anything!
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2013, 09:49:08 am »
Also, what's your opinion on 2d art placed over 3d backgrounds, like say this...

Works pretty well when you adhere to a common theme and don't just throw everything and the kitchen sink onto the canvas.

Offline Gec

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Re: Ask An Artist Anything!
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2013, 02:05:41 pm »
Also, what's your opinion on 2d art placed over 3d backgrounds, like say this...

Works pretty well when you adhere to a common theme and don't just throw everything and the kitchen sink onto the canvas.

Pat's got it right. The simplistic coloring and texture of any 3D object can blend well with 2D sprites. If you think about it, the 3D objects basically have 2D textures applied to them, especially if it's from the same artist or two artists with similar styles.

There's a hierarchy of character design that best explains this. One side of the spectrum you have "iconic" cartoon characters like Hello Kitty and 1920's Mickey Mouse. One the other side you have "realistic" characters like from comic books or Shrek characters. In between you have Simplistic (Hanah-Barbara, PowerPuff Girls), Broad (Tex Avery toons, Roger Rabbit), Comedy Relief (Kronk, Mushu), and Lead Character (Cinderella, Belle, Almost any Disney Princess that is one level below Realistic). You wouldn't put together an Iconic-Styled character with a Lead Character in the same setting together if you were aiming to make a believable film or game. But narrow the spectrum and put a Comedy Relief character with a Lead character in the same world and it makes sense.

As in the case with games, you wouldn't use those 2D sprites and put them in a game that has super-realistic textures and 3D backgrounds similar to Modern Warfare games or Crysis. As long as the artistic style stays within a narrow spectrum of simplistic or realistic, you can do whatever you like with blending 2D or 3D.

What do you think is a better way to make highlights and shadows, brushes or lineart?

I find that every artist has their own method of doing things, and there is no real right-or-wrong way of doing things. Like any simple, cheap ball point pen, the quality of the tool doesn't matter, but the skill of the artist that uses it does. You find what works best for you. And there is nothing wrong with trying out things that work with others. If it works for you too, Run along with it. If it doesn't, dump it and move on to something else. How well you use any tool in your craft will provide good work on it's own if you practice. Talent has nothing to do with it. The word "talent" is just other excuse other people use to excuse themselves for not trying. Talented people are talented because they practiced, developed a skill, and didn't stop doing what they were doing. I've seen people do amazing things with the simplest of tools like MS Paint. I can't do what I like to do with that program, but others can. You use the tools you are accustomed to and grow, expand, and experiment with it.

Offline Yuu

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Re: Ask An Artist Anything!
« Reply #7 on: August 13, 2013, 01:21:22 am »
Thanks for the advice, guys!  :)

Offline sgore

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Re: Ask An Artist Anything!
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2013, 08:04:16 pm »
This is probably a more general question, but what would you all say counts as a reasonable practice schedule? (That is, how many hours a day would you recommend one put into practice in order to show steady improvement?)
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Offline Gec

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Re: Ask An Artist Anything!
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2013, 08:27:47 am »
There is no proven technical or scientific way to improve artistically. In fact, it's wrong to see it that way or think that way. Art is all about your own expressions and passion. When that is there, the desire to put more work comes automatically. And your output will show, in time. Improvement takes years for some, others more or less. Everyone is different.

Don't think about hours that you have to put into this. The more you do, the more of a chore it becomes and you quickly get bored and it feels tedious. Just think about getting there. Keep an eye on your mistakes. Make mistakes! Otherwise you don't learn from them if you don't know what needs work. Practice, practice, practice. The more you do it, the better you get, of course. The hours you put in is up to you.

Offline Gec

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Re: Ask An Artist Anything!
« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2013, 08:44:34 am »
This came as a morsel of a revelation to me just recently. When I first started drawing as a kid, I did it because I was bored. Nowadays I draw but I tend to think too much about how cruddy it will look and sometimes give up. I was actually being harsh on myself and not letting myself make those mistakes. I made a mistake for every drawing I did as a kid and I wasn't worried too much because I was doing something that I loved doing. I was having fun. But I learned from my mistakes as I saw each of my drawings as I grew. I had developed a taste. With this taste it guided me on where I needed improvement.

So don't think about tedious exercise, how bored you will be drawing boring shapes repeatedly and whine about how slow you're progressing. Throw all that out the window. Just have fun with it. Your taste will find and push you to work on the things you need improvement on.