Poll

What should the examples for planets be from?

The real world where possible.
2 (50%)
The Gaming Steve Galaxy.
2 (50%)
Other (post opinion)
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 4

Author Topic: UFO King's Planet Classification System  (Read 2388 times)

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Offline UFO King

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UFO King's Planet Classification System
« on: September 27, 2011, 06:14:01 pm »
UFO King's Planet Classification System

Class A: Rocky body not massive enough to form itself into a spherical shape. [Asteroids]
Class A-1: Spherical body that is nonetheless surrounded in a belt of other rocky objects and thus a dwarf planet. [Ceres]

Class B: Icy body not massive enough to form itself into a spherical shape. [Kuiper Belt Objects]
Class B-1: Spherical body that is nonetheless surrounded in a belt of other icy objects and thus a dwarf planet. [Pluto]

Class C: Comet. [Halley's Comet]

Class D: "Carbon" or "diamond" planet, rocky and rich in carbon. Unremarkable in any other major characteristics. [Antor IV]

Class E: Oxygen-silicate planet, terrestrial and rocky but abundant in oxygen/silicon derivatives while poorer in carbon. Unremarkable in any other major characteristics. [Gliese 581 e]

Class F: Volcanic planet. May be due to natural geological activity or gravitational stress. [Io]

Class I: Composed of an iron-rich core with little to no mantle. Denser and smaller than other terrestrial planets on average. [Mercury]

Class J: Gas giant.
Class J-1: Ammonia clouds. [Jupiter]
Class J-2: Water vapor clouds. [47 Ursae Majoris b]
Class J-3: No clouds. [Neptune]
Class J-4: Alkali metals. [Osiris]
Class J-5: Silicate clouds. [Bellerophon]

Class K: Chthonian planet. Formerly a gas giant, now only its core remains. Could be due to massive impact(s) from other orbiting bodies or hydrodynamic escape. [Kepler-10b]

Class L: Capable of supporting life. Subclasses often overlap with other classes, but overrule them.
Class L-Genesis: Supports/can support some sort of life, but only in primitive microbial forms. [Mars]
Class L-Common: Terrestrial, supports carbon-based life with an oxygen atmosphere and water as a solvent. Typically within average temperature. [Earth]

Class M: Rocky, has some significant traces of ice whether surface or underground. Incapable of supporting advanced life. [Luna]

Class N: Cold and rocky, possesses both ice and significant quantities of other frozen substances like nitrogen. [Triton]

Class O: Surface is completely covered in water.
Class O-1: Orbits star closely, surface temperatures are extremely hot and water vapor is prevalent. May possess an unclear dividing line between air and liquid. [COROT-7b]
Class O-2: Surface is covered in a vast ocean of liquid water with few or no extreme anomalies. [Calla]
Class O-3: Entirely covered in solid ice, no liquid water whatsoever. [Mimas]
Class O-4: Surface is covered in a layer of ice, but another layer of liquid water exists below. [Europa]

Class T: Terrestrial planet blanketed in a thick atmosphere of gases that give rise to a global cooling effect. Liquid methane exists on the surface. [Titan]

Class V: Terrestrial world with a thick atmosphere of greenhouse gases. Surface temperature is extremely hot. [Venus]

Class W: Rogue planet, drifts through space and does not orbit a star. [Brithora]

Class X: Orbits a pulsar. Completely dead and constantly bathed in radiation. [Methuselah]

Class Y: Ecumenopolis. Fully one third or more of the planet is covered in a gigantic, sprawling metropolis. [Coruscant]

Class Z: Artificial space station so immense it's been rounded to compensate for gravitational forces. [Death Star]



And there you have it! A new innovational system for classifying various planets, moons, and other orbital bodies.

I've gotta know, though - Should the examples all be from the Gaming Steve Galaxy? I wouldn't mind seeing Nauceanica as the textbook example of L-Common, but Whiro and Korolon aren't as memorable or well-known as Venus and Jupiter.

Oh, and there's intentionally space left blank: Feel free to make well-thought out suggestions to me! And if you have a creature with an plausible native atmosphere/solvent/temperature different than L-Common or L-Genesis, just post info and I'll add it! Does it breathe ammonia? Does it drink methane? Does it like it hot or cold? Is it even carbon-based? You decide, but do the research first!


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Offline Kenotai

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Re: UFO King's Planet Classification System
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2011, 06:27:14 pm »
PSM/RNH/SPF is O-2, though I'm sure there has to be other examples in our Galaxy. Xo (of the Xonians) is a Y, as is Ju (of the Milika). Vyku is L-Common.
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Offline GroxGlitch

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Re: UFO King's Planet Classification System
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2011, 06:30:55 pm »
Neat! I've always wanted to go through and make one of these, I just never bothered  :-\

Offline UFO King

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Re: UFO King's Planet Classification System
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2011, 06:52:01 pm »
PSM/RNH/SPF is O-2, though I'm sure there has to be other examples in our Galaxy. Xo (of the Xonians) is a Y, as is Ju (of the Milika). Vyku is L-Common.
Awesome! Just remember that if it supports life, it's automatically Class-L. It can be other types at the same time, of course. By the way, looking forward to the Xonians!
Neat! I've always wanted to go through and make one of these, I just never bothered  :-\
Thanks, and look no further! If you've got a suggestion for a blank letter or another Class-L, just tell me!
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