Author Topic: Dvořák's No. 9 -- The Story Thread  (Read 2414 times)

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Offline Aybraus

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Dvořák's No. 9 -- The Story Thread
« on: March 25, 2008, 01:12:27 pm »
The goal of this thread is to put up anything related to the story that's being told in the Civilization IV PitBoss game I'm running. You can act in-character here, but it's not required or even encouraged.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2008, 06:11:18 pm by Aybraus »


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Offline tomasgaquino

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Re: Dvořák's No. 9 -- The Story Thread
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2008, 12:18:07 pm »
Metragirtan Empire - Ancient

There was once a nomad clan of fishers-gatherers that worshipped their ancestors and the forces of nature. Their major natural deity was the Ocean, for it gave them most of their supplies and it was such a powerful body of unending water.

A system where the strongest would rule the weakest ended up to break the old clan system, and the abundance of fish in a peninsular area of warm waters slowly led the nomads to turn sedentary, on a site called the 'Metagirta', around 3960 B.C. .

Metagirta was most precisely a forested peninsular area, with a rather unfertile land, but abundant on fish and natural harbors.

Grotesque artist representation of an early Metagirtan citizen.

It was soon obvious that there was another group of humans dwelling nearby. The Metragirtan ended up knowing that most of the fishing areas were already taken by the other clan, and  tension arose between them.
As soon as the first Metragirtans learned the other clan's language, they found out that they entitled themselves the "Black Forrestans", and a shy trade began between the two groups.

Still, it remained unclear whether the Black Forrestans would be a major threat, or a trustworthy friend of the Metragirtan people.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2008, 02:44:10 pm by tomasgaquino »

Offline Aybraus

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Re: Dvořák's No. 9 -- The Story Thread
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2008, 09:23:51 pm »
There was once a nomad clan of fishers-gatherers that worshipped their ancestors and the forces of nature. Their major natural deity was the Ocean, for it gave them most of their supplies and it was such a powerful body of unending water.
You know we're restarting and that your map position will probably change, right?
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Offline Aybraus

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Re: Dvořák's No. 9 -- The Story Thread
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2008, 06:50:28 pm »
From askthehistorian.co.ka:

What does the expression "Iya nalisti qota modisti" mean, and where did it come from?



Readers from my country probably recognize this phrase--it's what parents often say when their kids nag them about something they want. It's an old Kantonese* phrase that loosely translates to "you'll foil your hopes by mentioning them."
More literally, however, the phrase means "don't mention a fourth art." In Ancient Kanto, the line of God-Kings, all of whom were named Ōkk** until 3450 BC, closely adhered a philosophy based on what is now called "the Classic Trinity of Arts." It said that all men could achieve greatness through one of three distinct methods, or arts. Each "art" corresponded to a particular phenomenon that occurred in nature, which were very much like "elements" of other philosophies.
The first was the Art of the Plant, or growth to greatness through height. Leaders who favored the Art of the Plant sought to create works of artistic and cultural greatness that would make them visible to all, like a tree. The first few Ōkks favored this philosophy, building obelisks and other structures that made them seem like gods to their subjects.
The second was the Art of the Sea, which meant achieving glory by expanding horizontally. Leaders of the Art of the Sea remain unknown, as they were primarily nomadic people. Many Kantonese cities are known to be founded by Sea artists.
The third was the Art of the Flame, or glory through the destruction of others. None of the Ōkks liked this philosophy, but many counselors did, as reflected by the number of soldiers the Kantons made early on.
As time went by, different natural phenomena became known, and other political thinkers began to make up their own Arts to match them, many of which were legitimate ones. However, many of these thinkers were persecuted for their dissent. By mentioning their plans to achieve greatness, they landed themselves into trouble and prevented themselves from following through with them.
Despite this irony actually occurring, it is worth noting that most linguists consider the phrase to be a recent creation, made in the last 200 years at least.
*Not to be confused with Cantonese, the Chinese language.
**Recent historical evidence suggests that the God-Kings were not, in fact, actual people considered to be gods on earth. They are now believed to have been constructed figures invented by a long-standing group of elders, the true rulers of Ancient Kanto. Often the actors that they employed had to be replaced, which created the line of Ōkks, all with very different appearences.
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