Author Topic: The current state of MMOs  (Read 11852 times)

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Offline Mr. Wizard

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #60 on: December 11, 2007, 12:08:15 am »
Yeah, Richard Bartle's essay gets overused to defend bad idea's. On a related note, guaranteed respecs by having a finite character lifespan will allow Spades to go through the content at a steady pace!  :D

There is also the "Big Seven" of motivations for playing games: Social Interaction, Physical Seclusion, Competition, Knowledge, Mastery, Escapism, and Addiction. I dont think they have any specific name though. The one problem that I have with all these attempts at classifying gamers is the idea that one player behaves one way to the exclusion of other behaviours.

Offline Krakow Sam

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #61 on: December 11, 2007, 04:59:44 am »
Perhaps it isn't entirely the fault of the designers that they don't try anything bold and new. I remember Wizard saying at one point that players don't actually know what they want out of a game, which causes them to make stupid demands and have stupid expectations.
Although its not really something that can be controlled, perhaps all certain ideas (such as Wizard's aging system) actually need the player base to undergo a significant shift in attitude.
This isn't unknown. When games first began it was a case of the game designer being out to provide a challenge to the player. The games were extremely difficult to complete, and the designers did whatever they could to make the game as challenging as possible. If 90% of the players of your game couldn't last more than a minute playing the game then the designer had done their job well.
Then something about the player base changed (whether by the influx of new players or simply a change in the attitudes of veteren gamers) and suddenly the job of the designer was to provide a fun experience to everyone, often regardless of skill. The idea of a game anyone could complete would probably have horrified the players of the early hard as nails arcade games, but now any game which is percieved as unfairly hard is panned by critics.
Perhaps in the case of aging people actually need to move away from the idea that their character is some tangible thing which can be kept sitting on the server forever once it hits max level and consider it more as a transient entity thats always changing and experiencing new things.
I don't think i would personally have a problem with the death mechanic, as long as information about previous incarnations of a character was kept safe, so even if your character is no longer the lucky archmage who stumbled upon an artefact of awesome power in some forgotten ruins, you can still show off to people that you managed to do it.
Sam is basically right, he's just cranky.

Offline Kratok

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #62 on: December 11, 2007, 08:45:09 am »
Okay now for some reason Wizards idea seems to make sense for me. Atleast I think I think it makes sense. More likely I jumbled up two ideas.

Instead of having a complete start over new geneerations would pass over their armor and weapons and be able to start at almost the same place. Then this new character would get to start out newly but with the start off of his first class making an odd mixture of them all. Then every character would actualy be rather different because they have some class features of all of his past lives.

Still doesn't strike me as that good of an idea but it makes sense now.(I think)

Offline Xenomorph

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #63 on: December 11, 2007, 10:14:21 am »
so is huxxley the only MMOFPS there is?
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Offline Didero

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #64 on: December 11, 2007, 11:06:14 am »
...
I don't think i would personally have a problem with the death mechanic, as long as information about previous incarnations of a character was kept safe, so even if your character is no longer the lucky archmage who stumbled upon an artefact of awesome power in some forgotten ruins, you can still show off to people that you managed to do it.
That could happen with adding lineage, as in, you play the child of your old character. So you can still say you found the item, but in-character, it would be "My dad found this artefact in a cave while exploring", or something. And you would inherit the artefact, so you can still show it off.

Offline Daxx

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #65 on: December 11, 2007, 12:45:38 pm »
Ooh, that brings to mind some sort of genetics mechanic for stats. Like, at level 50 (or whatever) you can retire your character and have a child with another Level 50 character, and the offspring gets stats as determined by the parents.

That could get weird fast, though.

Offline Krakow Sam

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #66 on: December 11, 2007, 05:20:54 pm »
Thats quite cool, especially if there were some distinction made between inborn stats and aquired ones. Strength could be trained up by playing the game, but is ultimately limited by an unchanging 'athleticism' stat. Likewise knowledge could be gained, but intelligence would be static.

Unfortunately the extremely high male:female ration in MMOs would cause some problems... unless it was a sci-fi setting  ;)
Sam is basically right, he's just cranky.

Offline /lurk

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #67 on: December 11, 2007, 07:40:29 pm »
It sounds like you're talking about pokemon there. Actually, that's almost exactly like the breeding system in the pokemon games.

Weird.
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Offline Pinstar

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #68 on: December 12, 2007, 08:55:09 pm »
Hey my Fiance and I play MMOs together. It would be good practice for us :P

I wonder how much copper you'd get from vendoring a 20 stack of dirty diapers.
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Offline Celdur

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #69 on: December 13, 2007, 12:56:43 am »
It sounds like you're talking about pokemon there. Actually, that's almost exactly like the breeding system in the pokemon games.

Weird.

thats it! we need a pokemon mmo!

(no...not really)

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Offline The Time Traveller

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #70 on: January 13, 2008, 08:37:29 pm »
I'm going to use a "Slippery Slope, look where it's going" argument, similar to the one that says that humans will be immobile in a million years, to show the problem with mmos.  In about five decades, MMOs will have degraded into a style in which a character moves around a large plane with the arrow keys, gaining xp (which is useless, as nothing can be done with it) by clicking repeatedly on himself.  The only social element will be the chatting (characters can't even bump into each other, they just move right through one another).  In a few more years, the characters won't even be able to chat.  In a few more years, the character classes will have degraded (They already were only different in appearance), all characters looking the same.  In a few more years, all characters will be red circles.  In just a few years after that, characters will be immobile.  After that, the very multiplayer element will be removed, leaving just a red circle that raises a bar and flashes when clicked.  In the following years, the flashing is removed, leaving only a circle that raises a bar when clicked.  The final act is to remove the bar, leaving only a circle that can be clicked.  And yet, as creativity decreases, popularity increases.  At the end, all people are addicted to the click-circle, even the world government, which requires all to click on it constantly.  Humanity slowly uses technology to remove necesities like food that stop from clicking as much as possible.  Networks of people form hiveminds, and click on the circle together simultaneously.  These merge and merge, forming only a few hundred hives.  Finally, as they merge more and more, all humanities previous glory is erased, as one giant mindless supercomputer that clicks on a circle every picosecond.
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Offline B.A.S.

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #71 on: January 13, 2008, 11:06:05 pm »
Im thinking thats never going to happen.
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Offline Morslok

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #72 on: January 17, 2008, 05:08:32 pm »
The final act is to remove the bar, leaving only a circle that can be clicked.

Or, maybe, rather than remove the bar, the circle is removed.  The bar, without any input from the user, simply keeps... on... progressing...

Oh wait, that's Progress Quest!
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Offline Yuu

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Re: The current state of MMOs
« Reply #73 on: March 18, 2008, 10:52:14 pm »
http://www.ionconference.com/index.php?utm_source=next-gen&utm_medium=banner&utm_content=leaderboard1&utm_campaign=ion08_1

The ION Game Conference, one of the only game conferences that specializes on MMOs is about to begin in May. It tackles topics ranging from player psychology to in-game economics. Anyone interested in how MMOs work might want to check this out.