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Messages - Kregaaron

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1
Everything Else / Re: What to do with tons of old gaming magazines?
« on: February 20, 2011, 05:12:19 pm »
Toilet paper. Just close your eyes when you get to teh Laura Croft reviews.

-Lego


Might hurt...

2
Everything Else / Re: What to do with tons of old gaming magazines?
« on: February 20, 2011, 04:49:22 pm »
Eat them?

Do they go good with Tabasco sauce?

3
Everything Else / Re: What to do with tons of old gaming magazines?
« on: February 20, 2011, 02:58:17 pm »
If you could get a storage unit, that's what I would do.

Just how many magazines are you talking about? Were they weekly? Monthly?

They're about 12 years worth. EGM, EGM 2/GameNow, PC Gamer, Computer Gaming World, some Nintendo Power, Game Informer. All monthly if I recall correctly.

Been thinking of a storage unit myself, since really they just take up too much space now.      

Or you could just... you know.

Oh yeah, I could even end up like the Collyer brothers! That'd be an awesome way to go...

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Everything Else / Re: What to do with tons of old gaming magazines?
« on: February 19, 2011, 04:25:01 pm »
Edit your posts. Don't double triple quadruple post.

Sorry, I'll merge them.

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Everything Else / Re: What to do with tons of old gaming magazines?
« on: February 19, 2011, 04:15:37 pm »
Keep and preserve them. Give them to your grandchilden. They will then sell them in an auction in an era where paper has been replaced with flash drives you slot into your neck, and they will be rich!

I've been thinking of preservation myself, at least of some of them. Any ideas?

Quote from: UroborosGauphastus
Stop by a flea market, put them up on craigslist or an auction site. People will totally buy the stuff.
I've got a box full of OPM and EGM myself. Oh memories.

I've been thinking either craigslist or ebay myself, at least for some of them. Tons of old EGMs myself, dating back so many years  

Quote from:  /lurk
Buy a bigger house!.

Care to contributre the funds?   ;D


Quote from: martyk
Keep them somewhere.  Seal them up tight and store them deep in your parent's basement.  One day those magazines will hold precious memories, and will be very cool to show your kids and grandkids.

Parents basement would be a good option, if it existed for me! I may rent a storage unit for them though.


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Everything Else / What to do with tons of old gaming magazines?
« on: February 19, 2011, 03:14:26 am »
Alright, I'm in a sort of interesting predicament. Over the years (around 12ish) I've collected quite a bit of old gaming magazines, largely because I almost never have thrown away any of the gaming magazines I received in the mail. However, at this point, it's becoming too much for me, as now I live in a rather small apartment, I simply don't really have the space to spare, so while I don't really want to get rid of them, it seems I must. However, I don't simply want to throw them away, as something just feels wrong about tossing them, I can't say sure why, I guess maybe the feeling I'd throw away an issue that no one else has a copy of, and thus being permanently lost through the dust bin of history. so I'm looking for other options.

I'm thinking either selling, donating to whatever parties interested in such items, or a combo of both. Any suggestions though?

7
Console Games / Re: Are "hardcore" games a dying breed?
« on: February 15, 2010, 09:27:39 pm »
Most people TL;DR me or blanket dismiss/ignore me, so I didn't expect a full rebuttal or refutation. :-p

Haha, well I was serious in that I agree with you. I seriously doubt "farmville" will actually take over the industry, or facebook games period. I do think though, at least for a while, as you put it, casual games will certainly take a front seat in the industry (maybe even permanently).

Worst comes to worse, more complex or "hardcore" games will have their own Lars von Trier, who, just in case you don't know, established a foundation for the "Preservation of Elitist Films" or something like that. Their purpose is to preserve movies as they were intended before they went mass-marked. Those movies that receive critical acclaim, but will never be blockbusters. Simply because most people don't get them. It goes without saying that they don't do it for the money. They do it because they love making movies. They love pushing the boundaries, they love pushing themselves to be better and they don't really care about what you want from a movie. They do it for themselves or to make a statement. I can see the same happening with gaming *if* the mainstream market completely betrays that style of game.

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Console Games / Re: Are "hardcore" games a dying breed?
« on: February 15, 2010, 08:06:17 pm »
PC gaming will always remain hardcore
Phew, I was almost worried about all of this. Almost.

I disagree with Gorman's sentiment. PC Gaming is the genre most at risk. PC Game Sales, especially quality PC Titles in general, have been sliding down the tubes for years. "Casual" Gaming is also easier on computers because so many people have computers (almost as a necessity anymore), where as only the 'hip'/hardcore delve into Console Gaming (with the Wii being the exception), though there has been increasing market share and ease of use/availability in the Console Market (it probably outstrips PC gaming by a fair amount). Casual gaming has a ton more market penetration in the PC Market over any other market. High system requirements and the costs of upgrading/building a PC every 3-4 years ensures that the PC Gaming Market stays "pure" and hardcore as far as traditional gamers go, but low system requirements, low cost, and a large market of 'potentials' makes casual PC gaming a threat to the more traditional/hardcore PC gamer. Even if that threat is mostly over-hype.

Good points, but can your last comment be confirmed? I always thought the "big bucks" were certainly a part of getting into the industry. Then again, I've known plenty (myself included) who've wanted to get into the industry to make fun games as well. I'm not sure my type actually gets in though, so I'm asking. I don't know the psychology inherent in most game developers, so not a rhetorical question.

CEOs, company presidents, shareholders, and executive boards care about money first. Most of the people who actually work on the game (the actual game developers rather than the companies they work for/who publish them) care about making a game that is fun, accessible, and that is good. There is a concern about money, and whether the game will return it's investment and do well (it's a business after all). But from what I've seen from interviews with game developers, there is a emphasis on making a game that is good, fun and that they themselves would want to play. There is always the distinct presence of "will this make money?" when talking about game development. Someone could make an awesome, dynamic, deep, story-driven RPG-RTS hybrid with unique gameplay elements, but unless the markets are there for it to return the investment costs of developing the game it won't get made.

Personally, a RPG-T/FPS-RTS hybrid would be the most awesome game ever (especially set in a semi-modern fictional/Sci-Fi universe). The few games that have tried have been Medieval Fantasy-styled games (SpellForce, for example).

Anyway, back on topic. Casual Gaming will continue to have deep market penetration and the PS3 may be more at threat of skewing towards the casual end of things instead of the 360. My reasoning behind this is that a controller is much cheaper to buy, and far easier to use/setup than Microsoft's Project NATAL. A motion-control on the PS3 should only be about the cost of a normal controller (between 39-49 dollars), where as Project NATAL is a whole new accessory with 'new' and old technology (most of it's technology is actually quite old but some of it's uses are new) that needs to be bundled with a game in order to sell well so you are looking at LEAST a 100-150$ investment. If you look at it from the cost respective (depending on implementation) you could see an influx of Casual Gamers on the PS3 quicker and in greater numbers than in the 360. The 360 may have a larger Market share (though it is losing ground to the PS3, and cannot even begin to compare to the Wii), but the cost and general implications of having another accessory to find a spot for and connect to a system with an absurdly limited number of connections will prevent NATAL from making too big of an impact, right away at least. What I mean by "absurdly limited number of connections" is that the 360 only has 3 USB ports, one of which is used by the Wireless Adapter, and the default controller is wired as opposed to wireless which means that's at least one USB port gone. For prove of this (and to get a sense of the challenges involved for NATAL), go look at the history of Sony's EyeToy accessories.

Still, casual gaming will continue to grow and large publishing houses (like EA), as well as developers, will start to and continue to give increased weight to the creation, marketing, and sale of 'casual' games for at least several cycles. So anywhere from a few quarters to a few years there may be an increased presence in casual games and/or traditionally hardcore games with a casual streak and a decreased presence in traditional/hardcore games, but in the end the market will be burnt out, over-spent, and tapped out. The markets will eventually equalize and traditional gaming will most likely make a full come back as even more people come into the fold, until then gamers should remain vigilant and continue to support there game of choice. It may be a sparse few years in the "traditional gaming" markets (especially the problem-ridden PC Markets) but in the end I don't think casual gaming can kill the traditional/hardcore games.

Very interesting post. I don't have any refutation myself really, since I predict the same thing will happen as well. Still, want to get all sides of the issue...  :P

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Console Games / Re: Are "hardcore" games a dying breed?
« on: February 15, 2010, 08:02:36 pm »
Good points, but can your last comment be confirmed? I always thought the "big bucks" were certainly a part of getting into the industry. Then again, I've known plenty (myself included) who've wanted to get into the industry to make fun games as well. I'm not sure my type actually gets in though, so I'm asking. I don't know the psychology inherent in most game developers, so not a rhetorical question.

The average salery of a game developer is about $55,000.  Hardly enough to entice those who only want a high paying job.

Wow, I thought game developers made much more than that on average. Point well taken then.

Apparently though, the "developers" will be going where the "money" is, and it's all in facebook style games. Gaming Steve linked to this article and says on his twitter (unsure how many of you guys follow it) "this is happening right now".

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Console Games / Re: Are "hardcore" games a dying breed?
« on: February 15, 2010, 12:57:28 am »
If every other form of media can do it then why not gaming?

Besides, it's nigh impossible that EA would direct all their attention towards casual games.  Even if they did, many would probably leave and we'd have new companies sprinnging up.  Keep in mind that while it might be lucrative from a monetary viewpoint, most game developers are in the industry to build fun games, not make fat stacks of cash.

Good points, but can your last comment be confirmed? I always thought the "big bucks" were certainly a part of getting into the industry. Then again, I've known plenty (myself included) who've wanted to get into the industry to make fun games as well. I'm not sure my type actually gets in though, so I'm asking. I don't know the psychology inherent in most game developers, so not a rhetorical question.

11
Console Games / Re: Are "hardcore" games a dying breed?
« on: February 15, 2010, 12:17:06 am »
Then EA will become the Disney of video games.  But just because the biggest player is making casual games, doesn't mean that there arn't many, many others who are not.

*tips devil's advocate hat on again, that hat just loves me...*

If an gaming giant like EA may turn to gearing itself towards smaller casual games, I don't see how the smaller companies can survive not following such example, especially in this economy.

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Console Games / Re: Are "hardcore" games a dying breed?
« on: February 15, 2010, 12:00:59 am »
Every single genre has a wide variety of styles in order to appeal to a wide variety of audiences.  It will be no different with gaming.  In time, we will see a wide range of both "hardcore" and "casual" games.  The only reason this seems strange is because we're only getting into the casual games over the last few years.  They have exploded in popularity yes, but will they eradicate good games?  No.  If anything, large scale, epic games will become more common as both the technology increases to accomodate it, and the general acceptance of gaming by society as a whole brings in more money and developers.

Keep in mind that many, many gamers in the future will start with casual games when they are young before "graduating" in time to more hardcore games.  That's how I got into to gaming, and that's how I bet a lot of you got into gaming.

Nobody (except for Crazen because he is a freak of nature raised in a lab to be the human supreme) takes their first steps into gaming with something like Mass Effect.


Very good points there..

But I'm wondering, what's to stop companies like EA from just creating things like Farmville, which would make more money (allegedly) than ME?

Is there a critical factor I'm (and Steve) missing?

13
Console Games / Re: Are "hardcore" games a dying breed?
« on: February 14, 2010, 06:11:08 pm »
This is what gamingsteve had to further say on the subject.

"the proof is that a single game like Farmville have more players than all games combined that EA sold last year. Hardcore is just a few million players (loud players true). While casual is hundreds of millions, and growing fast, and the scary part is that casual players spend a lot of money on games, they just spend it in smaller amounts. Already Zynga, which is only 2 years old, is almost worth what EA is, and their overhead and expenses are A LOT less than EA. Zynga and other social gaming companies have a much bigger impact than hardcore gaming. The money just can't compare. A hardcore game can cost $50m+ to create, and might not make back it's cost. Casual games are a tiny fraction and can make money continuously and to a bigger audience. You will see EA and others go this direction. Zynga has 60m daily players. 1 in 6 people in the US are actively playing a Zynga game. That is ... crazy. Hardcore can't compete with this. How can games like Mass Effect survive in this environment?"~his twitter

That's pretty interesting, though I gotta wonder, isn't that new influx of "casual gamers" completely separate from the already existing gaming bloc that buy games like ME 2 and Fallout 3?

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Console Games / Re: Are "hardcore" games a dying breed?
« on: February 14, 2010, 03:31:30 pm »
Gorman is kind of going with what I was defining "hardcore" as, I only use that word because it's the popular vernacular in the gaming community at the moment. What I've been trying to convey is, will complex games die (such as say, Mass Effect, Fallout 3, Half life 2, etc. etc.) and games like FarmVille, Brain Age, and Wii Fit completely replace gaming? Or will both types be able to survive in the future gaming market, catering to two different demographs? A lot think the former can't survive, as games like ME, while profitable, are quite expensive to make, where games like FarmVille are quite inexpensive to make, and have more players.

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Console Games / Re: Are "hardcore" games a dying breed?
« on: February 14, 2010, 12:23:52 pm »
There is much I could say on the matter but I have the flu and don't really feel like making a large post. But yes and I predicted this long ago and pretty much everything I said would come has. Causal gaming is taking over and if it does not stop soon there will be no such thing as a hard core game. The Wii has done much better then the other two consoles and the industry will go where the money is. Why spend years and millions on a brilliant in depth game when you cut both the  time and money in half and make a causal game that will sell better.

Even now we are getting casual bits in to our hardcore games. You couldn't die in fable or price of Persia in order to make it accessible to causal players. Both assassins creeds were easy, theirs no death penalty in borderlands or bio shock. And later this year the real gaming consoles both get a causal downgrade. The 360 gets project NATAL and the PS3 gets a currently unnamed motion controller. If ether of those do well, kiss gaming goodbye because the gamers that have made gaming what it is today, will be abandoned and forgotten. In favor of the people that never gave a rats ass about it

Hi, thanks for your response.

I'm going to try to play devil's advocate here, as I'm looking for opinions across the board on this subject, and hope this sparks some interesting discussion.

I think I should really define what I mean by "casual" games, and "hardcore" games. By "hardcore" games, I think I really meant "mainstream" games, as in, having more complexity than farmville or brain age, like a game like Mass Effect or GTA IV. By "hardcore", I didn't mean an 2000 grindfest where you reached level 99 in the nuclear wastes fighting countless mutants. By many "hardcore" standards, ME 2 wouldn't fit as it downsized a lot of the grinding apparent in the first game (something I didn't have a problem removing), so, I was using a different (and possibly incorrect) definition.

But to reply to what you were saying (not as a refutation, but as a devil's advocate), Let's consider that the game market is expanding. Ten years ago, the majority of published fantasy was still LotR style Epic Fantasy. Laurel K Hamilton came along with her Laurel Haimlton series and JK Rowling came out with the Harry Potter series. Since then Urban Fantasy and Children's Fantasy has grown by leaps and bounds and possibly outsells the Epic Fantasy. Has that lead to a decline in Epic Fantasy? Not at all. More games are created every year as more people and more types of people play.

The demographics of gaming have changed and not everyone is interested in running through endless corridors blowing off the heads of evil demon-alien-****s, grinding for elemental drops in Shadowmoon Valley, or figuring out what combination of conversation and gifts will get Leliana to spread her legs for you.

However, there are enough hardcore players to make Modern Warfare 2 so profitable the developers could wipe their backside with 100 bills if desired.

Again, keep in mind I'm playing devil's advocate and not trying to directly debate with you.

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