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Messages - superstartran

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1
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 05, 2008, 11:35:02 pm »
Well is it not illegal in American law (The DMCA) to circumvent or reverser engineer or decrypt copy protection?


Yes but it's not illegal to see what a program is doing to your computer. That is perfectly within your rights. Plenty of programs will allow you to see what SecuRom does (although it takes some programming knowledge).


Of course, having knowledge about how the copy protection scheme works isn't illegal. I mean, they can't exactly prove how you got the information. :) That's one way of circumventing it.



As far as I know how the law works, there are a few things that help prevent abuses like this happening. You can somewhat apply the FTC Telemarketing Laws to this.

Basically the jist is you cannot misrepresent the product you are selling, you have to disclose EVERYTHING CLEARLY, and you cannot misrepresent the cost. This not only applies to Telemarketing, but it also applies to pretty much everything else that is sold, whether it is a video game, clothes, etc.


EA did not fully disclose SecuRom, how it works, etc. They tacked on very vaguely in the EULA that they have a protection scheme (DRM) near the end (meaning you would have to read over 30-40 pages to even find it). The OpenSSL is in there, but it's hidden away where most people wouldn't find it, and the method which SecuRom uses to install itself (and the protection methods it uses) are borderline illegal. There's alot of things going against EA, and you cannot simply say that just because you agreed to the EULA, that EA is bulletproof.


The EULA is a Civil Contract between the Company and the Consumer. Yes the Company has rights, but if the Judge feels that the Company misrepresented or used illegal methods, they can declare the EULA null and void, and thus declare the case in favor of the plaintiff. It will be a tough one of course, but even high paying lawyers have it cut out for them. I'm sure there are many disgruntled programmers in the United States willing to testify against EA, about how SecuRom works, etc.

2
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 05, 2008, 11:32:36 pm »
This is from 13thHour from R-Force Forums for convenience since we're discussing it here.


Mid just sent me a copy if the readme that can be found in a hidden directory under your username.

On XP C:\Documents and Settings\XXXXX\Application Data\Roaming\SecuROM , where XXXXX is your username.


readme.txt

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PLEASE DO NOT DELETE THE FILES IN THIS FOLDER BECAUSE YOU MIGHT LOOSE ESSENTIAL DIGITAL RIGHTS.
READ BELOW
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Technical Information for the PC Administrator:

The files securom_v7_01.dat and securom_v7_01.bak have been created during the installation of a SecuROM protected application.
It guarantees more user convenience because the original disc does not have to be in the local drive at all times anymore.
It is necessary for copy protected CDs, demo versions and protected software downloaded from the Internet.
The file contains your licences for all products which are SecuROM protected, therefore it will not be deleted automatically.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PLEASE DO NOT DELETE THE FILE BECAUSE YOU MIGHT LOOSE ESSENTIAL DIGITAL RIGHTS.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The information contained in securom_v7_01.dat will not be transferred to any other computer without your permission.

This security system is connected with a MS Windows Service called "SecuROM User Access Service".
This module is started automatically when launching a protected application if the user is logged in with Windows administrator rights.
In case users do not have administrator rights we recommend to keep it running.

See www.securom.com for further information

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The following text is reproduced here to comply with OpenSSL license terms:

====================================================================
Copyright (c) 1998-2005 The OpenSSL Project. All rights reserved.

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
are met:

1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in
the documentation and/or other materials provided with the
distribution.

3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this
software must display the following acknowledgment:
"This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project
for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit. (http://www.openssl.org/)"

4. The names "OpenSSL Toolkit" and "OpenSSL Project" must not be used to
endorse or promote products derived from this software without
prior written permission. For written permission, please contact
openssl-core@openssl.org.

5. Products derived from this software may not be called "OpenSSL"
nor may "OpenSSL" appear in their names without prior written
permission of the OpenSSL Project.

6. Redistributions of any form whatsoever must retain the following
acknowledgment:
"This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project
for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit (http://www.openssl.org/)"

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE OpenSSL PROJECT ``AS IS'' AND ANY
EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE OpenSSL PROJECT OR
ITS CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,
SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT
NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES;
LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT,
STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE)
ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED
OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
====================================================================

This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young
(eay@cryptsoft.com). This product includes software written by Tim
Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com).
====================================================================


Basically they have remote access to SecuRom on your computer.

3
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 05, 2008, 11:12:04 pm »
SL, SecuRom runs with Ring 0 Access. Daemon Tools and Alcohol all run within Ring 0. I think you of all people should know that emulation of a drive cannot be killed / prevented in Stealth Mode (which is pretty good might I add) unless you have Ring 0 Access (on a consistent basis anyways). Try making a 1:1 Copy and trying to run the game that has SecuRom in it. It'll prevent you from running it. If you want more information, I suggest you look around on the R-Force forums. There are plenty of knowledgeable "hackers" (or computer geeks with no lives if you want to call them that) that can tell you what SecuRom is capable of at R-Force.


Since you have some knowledge about programming, sorry. But, I will have to admit I have argued with non-programming people who don't know what Ring 0/1/2/3 are.



Yes, SecuRom autoupdates without telling you. That means it sends it does (secretly without telling the user) information back and forth between Sony. Now tell me that cannot be exploited. It uses OpenSSL (conveniently tucked away in the corner of the manual me thinks)



Here are a few issues with SecuRom (provided by R-Force.org)

SecuROM issues include:

- long disc authentication checks with each new gaming session
- black screen, lasting several minutes in some cases
- conflicts with virtual drives; blacklisting
- conflicts with Process Explorer (Microsoft Tool)
- issues with Nero Drive Image (Nero 6)
- defective discs cause authentication errors, making the game unplayable
- unexpected game crashes, freezes, lockups
- some Microsoft patches cause conflicts, additional patching is needed
- UAService7 installed without authorization (not used anymore?)
- leaves behind registry entries, which require special tools to remove
- also leaves hidden folders in the User's account
- probing your hardware and Windows software before each gaming session
- not all issues can be resolved
- unconfirmed reports of BIOS resets


If it was a Ring 3 program, it would cause serious conflicts when trying to prevent emulation (a.k.a. starting the game up with a emulated ISO). Windows Security wouldn't even let you do that as far as I remember, as a Ring 3 Program does not have the authority to access Hardware. Also, it has been known to see and blacklist older versions of Daemon Tools when detected. A normal Ring 3 program does not have access to do such a thing. A Ring 3 program can SEE what is going on (well, it shouldn't be able to see a Ring 0 Program like Daemon Tools running in Stealth Mode), but it cannot terminate or prevent a program from running. That is an administrative or higher user privilege, and that of course is Ring 0 Access (Which SecuRom has).

4
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 04, 2008, 10:34:15 am »
Well i was not talking about a special case. Just the general case. Of course if you terminate a process that is vital for the system then the system will crash. (As mentioned in the post i made after.) But that is not really the issue. The issue is if you can use a unprotected programs or processes that has more access they should to gain control over the system. (And so be able to crash the system if one wanted to.)

My discussion was more in the lines of how hard it would be to do it rather then what you can do with it.


It depends on how well written the program is. Anti-Virus and Firewalls which have Ring 0 Access are usually programmed with alot of safety checks, so they are much harder to exploit (although it has been done before). Emulation tools such as Daemon Tools, Alcohol 120, and a few other things can be exploited rather easily though. SecuRom has potential to be even worse, because you can send data to the computer with SecuRom installed to do a certain action (this was seen with BioShock, I'll have to look it up). They can disable/enable certain features of SecuRom on the fly essentially. You could potentially exploit it. Sure, it may be a pain in the ass, but SecuRom has access to pretty much everything (with the ability to kill processes, prevent them from running, among many other things).



I highly doubt however that Sony thought anyone would discover that SecuRom had Ring 0 access (god knows why, hackers are plentiful, especially script kiddies). They probably didn't put any protection on the exploitation of SecuRom. I'm sure someone's already developing a way of abusing it as we speak (just to prove a point to EA, Sony, etc.)

5
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 04, 2008, 10:15:50 am »
Would not just be able to run or terminate processes using the program be enough? If you write a virus that starts up other processes or shut them down then you would gain this access right?


It's a little more complicated then that.


Also, you can't just "terminate" the emulation. If you did that, Windows would go haywire and crash due to the way it recognizes drives. Emulated drives are recognized as actual hard drives or cd/dvd drives. When you terminate them, then Windows all of a sudden can't see it, and it's recognition of drives goes crazy and BOOM, crash.

6
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 04, 2008, 08:52:07 am »
Why would you believe anything from Sony, who made both SecuRom and StarForce, both which are very dumb protection schemes?

Sony did not make StarForce. This is irritating. Can't anyone get basic details right? Why does that keep happening? Like the "Petition to EA about the new Securerom and the number of times you can use your keygen." WTF? When I actually *read* the petition, it looked like the author of that petition thought a "keygen" was the key printed on the back of the game manual, but before I read it I was expecting that to be just about the most outrageous petition I had ever seen. If I were EA I'd have thrown it out without even reading it! Because someone didn't look up the meaning of 'keygen' to make sure they were right about it before starting a petition to try to influence a massive company? :|

Anyways, getting off that tangent, would someone please link to something which conclusively shows that SecuROM can be abused by ring 3 programs to gain ring 0 access, particularly if the user is a limited (not administrator) user?


Any program with access to Ring 0 can be abused. My bad I confused Sony and StarForce. You seem to be an EA supporter, so no sense in arguing with you.


Also, no one will show you how to conclusively show that SecuRom can be abused to gain access to Ring 0. That would be stupid. Anyone with half a brain would know you don't show how to destroy other people's property or gain unwanted access. Again, you seem to blindly believe that SecuRom can't access anything and do any harm to your computer, when you don't know a lick of programming. Emulation is run in Ring 0 (such as Daemon Tools, Alcohol, and other programs such as Anti-Virus and Firewalls), and the only way to search and prevent it on a consistent basis (which SecuRom does, but there are work arounds) is to have Ring 0 Access. Ring 3 Access would only allow you to search for certain processes, executable names, etc. but when Daemon Tools runs in Stealth Mode, you cannot possibly detect it (because it disguises the processes, etc).


Also, it would be against law to show how to gain access to Ring 0 to somebody's computer (without their knowledge and compliance) through this forum, and GamingSteve board admins would have to report whoever did it to the authorities (most likely the FBI / Local Police). No one wants to go to jail.

7
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 03, 2008, 08:25:23 am »
What are you saying exactly: Is SecuROM checking the CD/DVD drives when Spore isn't running? Why would it be doing it when it's running when we've been told that we don't need to have the DVD in the drive? And why would it be doing it when it *isn't* running too?

I find both possibilities difficult to believe.


Why would you believe anything EA says? Why would you believe anything from Sony, who made both SecuRom and StarForce, both which are very dumb protection schemes?


Yes SecuRom is pretty easy to get by, but it's still an annoyance that it is at Ring 0. The problem is that anyone can work with the code and exploit it to gain Ring 0 Access to your computer, therefore having complete control over it.

8
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 01, 2008, 08:30:26 pm »
"Simple Windows Operating structure:

A device in Ring 0 has more authority than anything in any other run level.

So any checks or interception in Run level 2 or 3 can be easily bypassed by Stealthed CD/DVD emulation. Running in Ring 0.

When stealthed, unless the DRM also runs in Ring 0, it cannot find it. If it does manage to find one or more of it's services. The likes of Daemon Tools or Alcohol 120% quickly write an update patch to compensate for this. "


- 13thHour from the R-Force.ORG forums.



Also, you cannot prevent/stop emulation of a drive without the computer crashing on you unless SecuRom has Ring 0 Access.


Also, SecuRom merely prevents the game from running, not killing your emulated drive like StarForce does/did. And it was pretty funny when StarForce did kill the emulated drive, because Windows goes haywire and there goes your computer.

9
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 01, 2008, 08:22:08 pm »
Facts about SecuRom

A. It can possibly shorten the life of your CD/DVD Drive due to the numerous checks it does on the drive.
SecuROM does not check to see if your Spore DVD is in your DVD drives. Presumably it only checks once - when you try to install Spore. So, I'd think this claim would only really be potentially valid for games for which SecuROM does frequent CD/DVD checks, and Spore is not one of them.

B. It has been known to disable multiple CD/DVD Drives.
Why would it disable your CD/DVD drives? Isn't that something an older version of SecuROM did, and only for a short time because they quickly removed that 'feature'?

C. It prevents a game running from a Virtaul Emulated Drive, but it does not kill the emulation, it merely prevents it.
I'm running Daemon Tools, and have been for years (Having tons of HD space, I made CD images of my game CDs so that I wouldn't have to fumble around with them and risk scratching them). SecuROM hasn't impacted or impaired Daemon Tools on my computer, it hasn't stopped the emulated drives from working, it hasn't done diddly squat to them... As far as I know, SecuROM and other DRMs haven't been able to detect DaemonTools or its emulated drives for quite some time now.

D. It is installed without the user being aware, and is relatively difficult for the average consumer to remove the software. It can be removed, however when you reinstall the game / start it up, Securom reinstalls itself.
Yeppers. And for whom it isn't relatively difficult, it's relatively annoying, especially if it keeps coming back. Hell, StarForce is easier to remove, which is a bit bizarre, considering how StarForce is far more invasive, IIRC - the company that makes StarForce posted an uninstaller program, or you could do it manually if you have a .reg file with a few reg keys to remove, and run regedit on it as SYSTEM (not too terribly difficult to do).

E. Securom disguises itself as software that has Ring 3 Access, when in actuality it has Ring 0 Access (Which supercedes the user). This means that Securom has higher access to the user, as Ring 0 mainly deals with hardware communication and Operating System (thus why it is known to disable CD/DVD Drives).

D. Securom is not a rootkit, although it comes very close to the definition. It is more akin to a "Trojan" kit. It does similar things such as smokescreen techniques (disguising itself as a Ring 3 Access software, when in reality it has Ring 0 Access).
I'm assuming these are true, but I really have no idea. I think you meant "higher access than the user" though.

For those who want to argue whether SecuRom has Ring 0 Access or not, use some simple computer logic. Daemon Tools, Alcohol, and other emulation tools all install to your computer and have Ring 0 Access. This is an area which is defended by the computer hierarchy, thus why both Daemon Tools and Alcohol say that potential damage can be caused to your computer by using this software. Ring 3 Access software could not possibly detect anything in the Ring 0 Access area, as the Operating System would prevent it from doing so. However, if SecuRom was installed with Ring 0 Access, then it can see any emulation tools and prevent them from working properly. Ring 0 Access is strictly used for Operating System and Software that deals primarily with Hardware (such as burning software, etc). SecuRom has no business being installed with Ring 0 Access.

Nothing's stopping a ring 3 program from looking for EXEs or DLLs or VXDs with specific names, exports, or whatever, or to check the registry to see if it's being loaded, so you can't say that if SecuROM weren't ring 0, it would be impossible for it to tell if <random emulator program> is on the computer, or that it would be impossible for it to change the registry to stop loading the CD/DVD emulators. However I've never personally seen that happen on my computer or any computers I previously had. I presume that by the time I ended up with SecuROM on my computer it either no longer interfered with them (Ha!) or is completely failing to detect them.

It would be nice if it would stick to ring 3... But presumably they'd like ring 0 so they can make sure the drive is really emulated or real, or something, not that whatever they're doing actually works.

I'm not clear on what happens if different programs come with different versions of SecuROM. Does anyone know?


Try running a image of Spore on Daemon Tools. It won't work. However of course, if you have the right cracks it does. That's SecuRom at work, since it is detecting you are trying to run Spore with a image copy with Daemon Tools. Plus, Daemon Tools is located in Ring 0, and has access to Ring 0. SecuRom can detect if it's running, but it can't detect what it is doing without Ring 0 Access.


And yes SecuRom does frequent checks on your CD/DVD drive. I looked at the code myself. Ask any of the guys on R-Force.org forums.

10
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 01, 2008, 04:23:10 pm »
Oh yes. It was when the gaming industry was consider young and foolish yet still could make a profit. It also saw the rise of great giants like Microsoft and Apple who know rules as gods. But you know Apple was not the know for music back then (Well there was apple records but they have no relationship with this apple) but they mainly made computer back then and had yet to discover to make art of making the outside as pretty as the inside. Today we only see a few companies still hold to the old ideas of DRM being useless. Back then it had been prove that DRM only lead to pissed of customers and that the same customers started to pirate software which had there DRM removed. Maybe they where more mature back then then we are today?



Also i have returned software but it was a long time ago. But i think the last time i did it was Ultima Online which was a pain. The store that sold it to me where nice actually and i got to replace my game with a other. (Really i wanted a other game if i could not get Ultima Online to work. But i think i did actually get my money back and then i decided to buy a other game.) Now i somewhat regret it as the copy would provably have gone up in value being one of the earliest Ultima Online copies. Normally i do a lot of research in to what i buy so i have only made a very few purchases that i have not been that happy about and none of those where return to store type disappointments. Still i support that if someone buy a product that does not work then they should be able to return it.

Oh wait there was one other case. I bought a game called Thorn of Darkness. Nothing wrong with the game. Just what i got form the store. Lacked manual and other impotent stuff so i returned it. Got my money back. End of story.


It's very very rare that happens.

11
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 01, 2008, 03:29:41 pm »
The EULA is not a foolproof document ether. The EULA have in some cases found invalid. I am not sure it would be valid in Sweden where normally you are required to actually read and understand the contract you sign. (The fact that most people do not read them and that checking a box it should be enough proof for there inadequacy.)

Also i wonder. Ones in a time there where no EULA. Yep that is right there was no EULA when you bought you software. And times where not worse then really. At least i do not remember them back in the 80's and early 90's.


You essentially automatically agree to the EULA by purchasing the game. Since no one allows software returns, if you do not agree with the EULA, you are stuck with the game. You cannot read the EULA before purchasing the game, which is unfair. It's like saying when I go buy a car, I have to sign first before I can read what kind of contract I'm getting into. Abit stupid no?

12
Spore: General / Re: EA hit with class action suit over 'Spore'
« on: October 01, 2008, 02:05:52 pm »
Facts about SecuRom

A. It can possibly shorten the life of your CD/DVD Drive due to the numerous checks it does on the drive.

B. It has been known to disable multiple CD/DVD Drives.

C. It prevents a game running from a Virtaul Emulated Drive, but it does not kill the emulation, it merely prevents it.

D. It is installed without the user being aware, and is relatively difficult for the average consumer to remove the software. It can be removed, however when you reinstall the game / start it up, Securom reinstalls itself.

E. Securom disguises itself as software that has Ring 3 Access, when in actuality it has Ring 0 Access (Which supercedes the user). This means that Securom has higher access to the user, as Ring 0 mainly deals with hardware communication and Operating System (thus why it is known to disable CD/DVD Drives).

D. Securom is not a rootkit, although it comes very close to the definition. It is more akin to a "Trojan" kit. It does similar things such as smokescreen techniques (disguising itself as a Ring 3 Access software, when in reality it has Ring 0 Access).


For those who want to argue whether SecuRom has Ring 0 Access or not, use some simple computer logic. Daemon Tools, Alcohol, and other emulation tools all install to your computer and have Ring 0 Access. This is an area which is defended by the computer hierarchy, thus why both Daemon Tools and Alcohol say that potential damage can be caused to your computer by using this software. Ring 3 Access software could not possibly detect anything in the Ring 0 Access area, as the Operating System would prevent it from doing so. However, if SecuRom was installed with Ring 0 Access, then it can see any emulation tools and prevent them from working properly. Ring 0 Access is strictly used for Operating System and Software that deals primarily with Hardware (such as burning software, etc). SecuRom has no business being installed with Ring 0 Access.

13
Spore: General / Re: The Grox (Spoilers)
« on: September 09, 2008, 10:22:43 am »
Hrm, I have alliances everywhere on nearly every galactic arm, a few quite close to the core. I'll see if I can get an "Intergalactic Alliance" against the Grox and see how it fairs.

14
Spore: General / Re: 1,000 1 star ratings on amazon.com
« on: September 09, 2008, 10:16:01 am »
I feel a little bit as if the DRM haters are barking up the wrong tree.  Read any license agreement... any of them.  You don't own a game.  You don't even own a license.  You are "granted" a license by the owner of said software.  This license can be revoked/changed/reissued at their sole discretion.  Just like MMO accounts (a less abstract analog);  you don't own your characters.  You pay for the license and for the space and processing time your characters take up.  Once you cancel your account, your license is revoked (you can't play anymore) and sometimes your characters are deleted.  All you have left is a CD with an invalid keycode (barring reactivation).

This, to me, sounds a hell of a lot less fair than making someone go online to prove their identity and to bind a serial with an account.

PS -- a fun one to read is a Microsoft EULA.  It literally strips you of all freedoms and privacy when you agree to use their software.  If you were to try to sue MS because your identity got stolen because of a security hole in their software, you have no case at all.  MS is literally bulletproof because everyone just skips the EULA and has to install Windows.

And about privacy issues... if you're doing everything right and encrypting your private data and not downloading anything and keeping your nudey pictures (that you purchased from a legitimate site) hidden away from prying eyes... what do you have to worry about?  And if you know how bad the computer world is about privacy invasion, the government already knows how many times you've sneezed in your life.  They know things about you that you've already forgotten.  There is no privacy.  If you want even the slightest illusion of privacy, turn off your PC, burn your HDD, cancel your credit cards, and start hoarding cash while wearing rubber gloves whenever you touch anything.


The problem is an EULA has never been challenged in the civil courts (to the best of my knowledge). If it were challenged, it's very possible someone could put a huge dent in the DRM/Starforce/Protection bananza. Sure, Microsoft is nearly bullet proof. That doesn't mean they can't be hurt.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Microsoft#cite_note-10


Remember this? Sure, they won the appeal and Microsoft survived. But guess what, they have been under fire ever since. Microsoft's lack of security has really driven users away from Windows. In the early 2000s, yes, Microsoft was more dominant then ever. However, it's not like Microsoft is still running away with the market. They've slowed down quite abit since the early 90s and early 2000s. Sure, they have a huge market still, but they are no longer the only big kid on the block.  Due to piracy, viruses, and other issues with Windows, Microsoft is slowly losing ground to their competitors. For example, Mozilla, Apple, and Opera all have far superior browsers then Microsoft. Anyone who surfs the net frequently and has some computer knowledge usually switches away from Internet Explorer. Also, in terms of Operating Systems, they are not the only big kid on the block now. Apple is beginning to surface as the primary challenger to Microsoft.  Sure, you can be the bully and force your way into everything. But not everyone is going to like you. And in the end, it's going to bite you in the ass.


You could argue that the EULA is unfair and legally unsound, violating certain rights / amendments. No one has ever done it before, and I would love to see someone do it to EA just to show that you can't go around bullying everyone. DRM has never worked, and never will. Company shareholders are not stupid, they do their research. They know that by adding DRM, you are actually reducing sales. I'm sure they are unhappy as we are. However, EA has always been known to try to bully their way to gain more money. Does anyone remember the deal struck between the NFL and EA? It essentially killed any company that was trying to make a football game. It was a huge blow to 2K Sports.


What is the point of DRM again? To prevent piracy? It doesn't work. It never has, and it never will. The only thing that sells, is the quality of the game. The Elder Scrolls : Oblivion by Bethesda has no protection on it, only a physical DVD / CD check. It was pirated too, probably in mass numbers. Guess how many copies it sold? Well over 3 million. Want to know why? Because it's a GOOD GAME. People BUY good games.

15
Spore: General / Re: I found Earth! (Spoilers)
« on: September 09, 2008, 09:23:25 am »
Let's find out. 

edit:  Nope, the planet buster is greyed out when you're on your homeworld.  If you move your mouse over the attack, it says "Can't use on homeworld"


Have you tried removing the atmosphere completely while raising the temperature of your home planet?

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